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the vast oil wealth to cut unemployment and poverty. he has become a critic some of the united states and made friends with its enemies. critics say he is dangerously dogmatic. what will happen if he's incapacitated? >> if he's out of the picture, there will be dramatic changes in venezuela. it is a coutnry used to having chavez at the center of the political anatomy. >> claiming to champion the poor and depressed every year, can his political creed survive? that as well as praise for uncertainty and change. -- is braced for uncertainty and change. >> i spoke a brief time ago with the president of the inter- american dialogue. if he is too sick to be sworn in for his new term as president, what happens? dodge the opposition is beginning the top line. they are different interpretations and a very polarized situation. >> what are the main challenges facing venezuela? >> high inflation, a huge fiscal deficit, a major oil producer. the insecurity and violence and crime has risen dramatically. whatever government succeeds, he will have his hands full. >> he was defiantly anti- american. an
of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choose quickly because time is running short. >> rose: other topics included the ongoing debate on gun control, and the lack of diversity in the second term appointees. joining me from washington al hunt of bloomberg news and from the white house major garrett of cbs news. thank you. al better i start with you. characterize for me the president in temperament and in words on the debt ceiling. >> charlie, i think he realizes he has a winning hand substantively on this and there will be caveats in just a moment. i was struck, however that what this really, his last press conference his first term showed he should have had a lot more than he did. because he's rusty. if was almost analogy can be made to that first debate. he went on too long for a while. he stepped on his narrative some. and if you read t i think reads better than it looked. the reason i say i think he believes he has the upper hand on the debt sealing is because republicans have a losing hand. they don't want to hold the full faith and credit of the united st
to the next president of the united states. this was a different man. >> there are tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands who have gathered in grant park in chicago. >> ladies and gentlemen, the next first family of the united states of america. >> narrator: only four years earlier, he'd been a state legislator. >> the look on his face to me looked like someone who finally understood the weight of the job that he had just won. >> almost as if the weight of the world had rested on his shoulders. >> the road ahead will be long, our climb will be steep. two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century. but america, i have never been more hopeful than i am tonight that we will get there. i promise you, we as a people will get there. god bless you, and may god bless the united states of america. >> narrator: if he had any idea that night how difficult this would be, the next day would prove it. >> so much for that election day euphoria... >> the economy has now lost 650,000 jobs just in the past three months... >> all eyes are now on barack obama to turn it around...
destruction that justified a war, the invasion of the united states. we are still searching for those weapons. they didn't exist. thousands of americans lost their lives. we could have a hearing on that if you'd like. >> ifill: while the benghazi attack was the main focus, secretary clinton also turned her attention to upheaval elsewhere in north africa. >> benghazi did not happen in a vacuum. the arab revolutions have scrambled power dynamics and shattered security forces across the region. instability in mali has created an expanding safe haven for terrorists who look to extend their influence and plot further attacks of the kind we saw just last week in algeria. >> ifill: in mali, elements of al qaeda in the islamic maghreb, known as a.q.i.m., have seized a large swath of territory, prompting france to intervene militarily with air power and ground troops. the u.s. military is providing transport flights to aid the french, and clinton said other assistance is under consideration. >> it is a necessary struggle. we cannot permit northern mali to become a safe haven. people say to me all the
premiums not keeping pace with high medical costs this year that hit shares of united health care. the stock fell 4.7% as volume almost tripled. this is its lowest price since mid-november. investment bank deutsche bank downgraded its rating of the managed health insurance sector, including united health care to neutral. the analyst pointed to more competition for customers holding down premium price increases. retail stocks were in focus with many of them reporting december sales. we'll have more on that in a moment, but two very different retailers had very different updates on their financial outlooks. deep discount store family dollar cut its outlook after a disappointing quarterly profit. shares fell 13%, dropping to a 10 month low. teen apparel store hot topic jumped 11.1% to a new 52 week high. hott topic predicted its earnings growth this year to be twice what wall street analysts had expected. just what spiced ham needs, peanut butter. spam maker hormel foods is buying the skippy peanut butter business from unilever. hormel is paying $700 million for skippy. the deal cont
, is here in the united states. that is not american exceptional is and we can be proud of. if we cannot agree to do something about that -- we did it about cigarettes, thank god. if we cannot do it, then let's just toss the old tall in now. >> can i pick up on that? >> with cigarettes, we had a de-glamorization campaign. we had tremendous success. smoking has been cut in half in about 50 years. it is the result of a culture. if we are talking about shootings and guns in this country, the equivalent would be the glamorization of guns in hollywood, videogames come in and on television. so you would want to start with that, but nobody in power will speak about that. the other elements are on the commitment of the mentally ill. there, the aclu and other lobbies are very strong. n those law were committement levels are straight, it is different. the only way you can ever achieve anything is the australian did it. 1996, they had a massacre. they confiscated guns, and there were none. that cannot be done. you cannot do it in this country, with its history, culture, and its second amendment. >>
of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. and they better choose quickly because time is running short. >> brown: congress has until march to raise the debt ceiling and prevent a government default. most republicans have insisted that with the government facing another trillion dollar deficit this year, any increase in borrowing authority must be tied to cuts in spending. the president flatly disagreed. >> i want to be clear about this. the debt ceiling is not a question of authorizing more spending. so while i'm willing to compromise and find common ground over how to reduce our deficits, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. >> brown: the 2011 stand-off between the president and republicans over the debt ceiling led the nation to the bryning of national default. standard and poors even lowered its rating on u.s. government bonds. today, president obama said any repeat performance would be, quote, irresponsib
in the united states, we subscribe to the quote, unquote myth of the imperial presidency. other transformational democratic presidents such as fdr and lbj, rockman says, have substantial democratic majorities in both the senate and in the house to enact their landmark legislation. obama in contrast has had to work with a narrow democratic majority in the senate and with an opposition party, the republicans in control of the house for the two years since january 2011. well, what about ronald reagan? president of the united states two successful four-year terms. on the domestic front, he enacted a major economic recovery package followed by an overhaul of social security. and in his second term, reagan gained a major tax reform. on the defense front, republican president reagan again with the help of the rity presided over a major increase in the defense budget, congress presided over a major increase in the defense budget, the defe including straby millions of protesters here and abroad. also commander in chief reagan gained secret aid for freedom fighters in central america, the quote unquote co
the floor of the united nations. the united nations charter does not allow any country to use on authorized military action. we have to be very careful about the precedents that we are creating. >> are you saying that drug strikes are illegal? >> this is not the first time i am saying to us. they are illegal and unlawful. we are enaging in a deep dialogue with the united states. we share teh view that they start seeing it as a counterproductive tool in the long run. >> sometimes there referred to as good taliban and bad taliban. it is okay for the americans to be targeting some and not others. >> they have called in the ambassador. what you might be calling quiet is quiet diplomacy happening in the background. today, the relations are at a much better spot. there is absolutely no question of pakistan finding these to be -- you ask about good taliban and bad taliban. any insurgent group which uses violence as a means to prove its power is harmful to the national interest of pakistan. any group that uses violence is counter to our interest. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." as the
channel of reconciliation taking place. and during those meetings both afghanistan and united states agreed to support mover a u.s. lead air force which is based out of dojas qatar. >> brown: doesn't much of this depend on the notion that there has been great success by the u.s. forces and afghan force and now afghan forces can keep the ball going so to speak against the taliban? is that the case? >> well, when you travel to afghanistan you do see the afghan security forces require a lot more capabilities but ability to gather intelligence, air transport, having canons and type, still to rely on nato forces to provide that that is ask president karzai is asking for these things so the afghan security forces can operate more independently. >> brown: what do you think of the assessment of the security forces. >> i would agree, there is a big question of fiscal responsibility. things are moving in the right direction. the combat forces have taken over the combat role and now 75% of the country, but it will go up to 90% soon as the president mentioned. but missing in the discussions, and
the defense department, from african policy experts, and remotely, from mali about the need for the united states to lead an effort that will restore security and the territorial integrity of mali but also to make sure that we move towards free and fair elections so that there is a legitimate post couey election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> t
accomplish as secretary of state? >> well, first, i think she did the basic job of representing the united states abroad tirelessly and well. she was very good in public forums. she would-- when she visited countries like pakistan, meet with audiencees, take questions, be very visible. as secretary, she did not have a record of substantial negotiation-- a la henry kissinger, jim baker. it's hard to find things like that on in her record, but on representational side, very strong performance. also in terms of being loyal to president obama. the obama white house was concerned in the beginning, that this superstar, part of team clinton, was going to over-shadow the president and the white house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you woul
of two things: one is a business environment in the united states that allows companies based here to compete successfully in the global economy but while maintaining or improving the standard of living of americans. we have to do those two things together to be truly competitive. if business is succeeding by cutting wages, that's a sign we're not competitive. so competitiveness is fundamental not only to companies and business but also really to the future prosperity of american citizens. >> susie: michael, people say that in order for the u.s. to be competitive it has to be a center for innovation. by that definition, how are we doing? >> well, i think the u.s. actually remains a tremendous juggernaut in terms of innovation. if you look at r&d speing in the entire world, we account for by far the largest share of r&d spending. we continue to be a major source of patenting and new companies. but the problem is not so much today innovation, the problem is that our business environment has got sufficiently inefficient and high cost and cumbersome that we're not able to capture the f
to women, many in army and marine infantry units. commanders will have to decide whether women will be eligible for elite forces, such as the navy seals and the army's delta force. >> let me be clear-- we're not talking about reducing the qualifications for the job-- if they can meet the qualifications for the job then they should have right to serve, regardless of creed or color or gender or sexual orientation. >> brown: the move drew wide praise from women's groups and others. but one former member of delta force, now with the conservative family research council called the move another social experiment. jerry boykin, said in a statement that commanders will now have the distraction of having to provide some separation of the genders during fast moving and deadly situations. is it worth placing this burden on small unit leaders? i think not. panetta's announcement followed a house hearing yesterday on sexual misconduct in the military. a recent study found that in 2012 alone there were some 800 reported incidents. but general dempsey said ending the ban on women in combat w
economy not being led by the united states. not a singular globalization. some of those countries will have much slower years than they had before. i'm thinking about india. some of those countries will grow quickly, but they will have much more conflict with foreign nations, and investing will be much more dangerous. here i'm thinking about china, and some of the emerging markets don't deserve to be called emerging. the they should be called sub merging. in particular, i'm thinking about russia. two-thirds of the worlds economic growth comes from emerging markets, and yet they are manage more volatile and unstable. >> i have to mention the united states bu the u.s. appears on your list of global worries. even after we address the tax cuts and the fiscal cliff? >> less worrisome, but less worrisome in the united states is the housing structure, and we've got stock markets doing relatively well, and we have a massive energy boom we're just in the beginnings of. but washington politics are toxic and getting worse. the debt limit and the frustration will be harder to deal with than t
court arguing under what circumstances the debt of the united states should be paid or could be paid. it gets into really nasty stuff. >> reporter: but veterans of washington's budget battles say the rhetoric jack lew will face will be much nastier than the ultimate outcome. >> the debt ceiling is going to be an ugly fight, perhaps as ugly or even uglier than what we went through at the end of last year, but the real fight is not over the debt ceiling, the real fight is over deficit reduction and the debt ceiling is not a lever that will ultimately be pulled. being treasury secretary over the next couple of years is not going to be an easy job, tom. >> tom: what do we know about lew's background, darren, that could inform us how he may treat the negotiations over the debt ceiling? >> he has been described to me as a pragmatic progressive. he has been around for 25 years in washington, and he has been involved in almost all of the major budget battles. so he is widely respected. he really knows his stuff, and he is seen as a calm but fierce negotiator. >> tom: did he play any role bac
is a friend and ally of the united states. i was with nixon. he rescued israel even though they weren't a formal ally. people believe that but they disagree on the agenda of netanyahu. >> sought doesn't mean we are unaqifly allied with or support the programs of netanyahu. >> that's been true of every israeli prime minister. not every policy of every prime minister was supported by the united states. that's where the prime minister of israel better make sure that he knows where the united states is coming from, and i suspect that this president is not going to abandon israel. >> we've got to get -- >> clarify what i said. the president and the obama administration does not want to use forcing a gains iran. but that option is e two. gun control. national and state. >> there is nothing that has pricked the consciousness of the american people, there's nothing that has gone to the heart of the matter more than the visual image people have of little six-year-old kids riddled -- not shot with a stray bullet, riddled, riddled, with bullet holes in their classroom. and the public demands we
: >> if there's no evidence that google engaged in search bias in the united states, it seems to me entirely unlikely that there could be that kind of evidence in the e.u. so i think we're going to see a very similar result in europe. >> reporter: still, another issue has popped up to plague the search giant, the state department today called a planned humanitarian visit to north korea by google executive chairman eric schmidt, "not helpful." and stressed he's traveling as a private citizen, not a representative of the u.s. government. >> susie: the auto industry closed out 2012 with a bang, marking its best year since 2005. december sales of cars and trucks were better than expected, and 2013 looks to be another banner year for the industry. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: worries about the fiscal cliff weren't enough to keep buyers out of car dealerships last month. people were buying a lot of cars and trucks. >> there gets to be that certain point where buying that used car or even leasing a new a new one or even just outright buying a new one, it's really not that much more to buy a
the european union and the united states and to some extent the african union as well. >> suarez: why does this, mary jane deeb, immediately implicate eu? >> well, because once you attack the infrastructure which produces oil, gas and which link africa to europe, then you can create havoc in the institution of oil. and so it is important. i mean the french understood the importance of the movement in mali. they understood that as professor vandewalle was saying that once you have a movement, once you take over power w it's not simply, you know, e ploding a car here or there t is actually take over power in mali, then similar movements would be allowed to do the same in the region. >> suarez: so you buy it that the algerians under muktar are acting under sympathy with those in mali. >> absolutely. i have no doubt that the radical islamists in nrt africa and those who are in neighboring countries including in nigeria are in sympathy. so and this is what the french want to stop. and the algerian government as well. because algeria itself is not that stable and could be further destabilized by the
consensus, around 48 million iphone units, 22 million ipad units, a little less than consensus, and a little disappointing to investors, and certainly when you have the forecast that was light on top of it, it makes for a disappointing quarter. >> tom: i can already hear those apple shareholders saying financial expectations are just impossible for apple to exceed. they're so high. what do you say to them? >> well, i think investors may have caught up to apple's stunning growth, but perhaps the law of large numbers, i think growth is getting increasingly harder to achieve. i think the easy growth has already happened in the iphone in developed markets like the u.s. the next wave of growth will come from emerging markets, from china and lower-priced phones. so apple may have a harder time getting that sort of growth. >> tom: i think 61% of its business last quarter was done internationally. showing how important the international shares are. what about comply constraints that apple may have experienced. there was lots of talk about that with the apple iphone 5. are those restraints continuing
to the united nation and efraim halevy who served in the israel national security council. i'm pleased to have them both on this program to talk together at this table about important things that are going on in their region including elections, mr. ambassador, thank you for coming. tell me what we read into the jordanian elections and what they tell us about the future of jordan. >> well, thank you very much for having me on the show, charlie. i think for all of us, we believe yesterday was a day of celebration. we had good turnout. the majority of those who registered to vote. and they were 70% of the eligible voters, eye majority voted yesterday. and this is a record in terms of the numbers who have turned out. but also more than that, they signified because the elections were not simply undertaken to fill seats in parliament, but they signified it was almost like a plebiscite it they signified that the country and the vision his majesty has for the country is supported by the majority of those who registered. and then took part in the elections yesterday. so we believe that it was a day of
, the united nations organization thinking about children. and organizations like that, you know, talk about all the right things. but what he saw was that the vaccines weren't getting out to all the kids. only 25% of the world's kids were getting vaccines. and he decided he would build a measurement system-- this is in 1980. he built one that measured facts and coverage, and he would go and embarrass the political leaders whose countries had low numbers, praisethe ones who did it well. it was cheap snuff so incredibly impactful that he got vaccination from 25% up to over 70%. he saved more lives between 19 eighty and 1990 when he did that than anyone in all of history ever has, and yet, you know, he's not -- >> rose: known by many people. >> yeah, very obscure. when i went to buy the book about him, it was completely out of print. so it's impress they have it was a measurement system along with his moral correctness that let him achieve that dramatic result. >> rose: but the interesting thing, too swhen they stopped paying attention, it slid back down. >> that's right. as soon as it wasn't
. >> let's take you to our main news -- congressional officials believe the united states state house of representatives will not vote tonight on a deal to avoid the implementation of a tax rises and spending cuts due to come into effect at midnight. fireworks celebrating numerous capital from the world at the start of the new year. foreign combat troops will pull out of a afghanistan in 2014, leaving afghan soldiers to fill the gap. afghanistan may not be able to look after themselves without foreign help. >> if there is progress, it has come with a price. the 44 soldiers were killed in so-called insider attacks or shot by rote afghans they're helping to train. it is out of this captain died, playing football here on remembrancer sunday. he was the last british fatality of 2012. >> it affect you personally and are never to raise about that. we will always grief for walter but we will not drop what we're doing because of one individual. >> with the afghans are taking responsibility, leaving most military operations -- leading most military operation that letting foreign troops step ba
and what is most dangerous is the criticism from europe and the united states, not from the people who don't particularly like us. >> benjamin netanyahu and barack obama have never been close, and the u.s. president is resigned to a difficult relationship with a more right-wing government in israel. -- >> an election watched very closely, even here on inauguration day, and prince harry is on his way home after another toward of duty in afghanistan. he has confessed that he prefers army life to being a royal. and he has claimed to have killed taliban insurgents. >> for the last 20 weeks he has disappeared from public view, deployed to afghanistan and flying apache attack helicopter. >> this has reminded me about who i am, but is -- it is easy to forget about who i am in the army. >> he has had to be prepared to use lethal force against the taliban. -- >> the people that are trying to do bad stuff -- they will be in the game, i suppose. and the reason i did this job is to get back out there. >> keep -- he deployed to afghanistan under a cloud. he made what he excess was a serious mistake, he
but three of the bricks bricks are facing head wind greater than we have seen in the united states, not brazil, which is developing increasingly becoming more regularized but in the china and russia, and i go back to the beginning. >> rose: the risk is what is going to happen to them? >> the risks are different for different countries but in many of these emerging markets, they are actually facing significant internal political head wind and lacked the political will to continue with economic reform and they will be punished by the markets, in some cases they are not emerging at all, but submerging and backsliding, russia is certainly a case of that where you look at everything about the russian investment climate and look at the brain drain they are experiencing and the capital flight they are experiencing. >> rose: and look at the demographics. >> look at the demographics, they are improving a little but not enough and you see a country that by no means should be a bric and should not be an emerging market, one quick point, bk when the u.s. was having its election you had so many
to american spehr convenience abroad. he's i think very skeptical that the united states, when it exercises its force abroad, is doing the right thing, is helping the good. >> you can say that about a man who volunteered to go to vietnam? >> i don't think that's a relevant issue. i think it's quite noble and honorable that he did so. i think if you asked his friend, say, senator mccain, who also went to vietnam and suffered quite horribly, they have a different view about the exercise. >> fair enough. about american power. ifill: do you think that that vietnam experience and how it has influenced whatever his thinking is today is a good thing or a bad thing? >> i would say in senator hagel's case it has been a profound... it has had a profound impact on him. he's the first generation of what you might call the vietnam syndrome. he's scared of the use of force abroad. i would just suggest that since world war ii i think the order that we have known, the prosperous more or less peaceful order that we have known as been because of the exercise of american power abroad. i think senator hagel wa
but held dozens of foreign workers including united states citizens. there is conflicting information about the algerian raid and there is no confirmation on how many cappers and hostages were killed. the milton reportedly demanded an end to french him tear activities in mali in return for the hostages. the situation in mali is also critical. on friday last week france launched an area bombing campaign against rebels with ties to al qaedament since then a ground force has engaged in combat with rebels trying to stop their advance to mali's capital. it remains unclear what support will be offered by the united states. secretary of state hillary clinton addressed the situation earlier today in a joint press conference she had with the president of somalia. sheikh mohammed. >> now let me say the situation is very fluid. it's in a remote area of al geria near the libyan border. the security of our americans who are held hostage is our highest priority but of course we care deeply about the other algerian and foreign hostages as well. and because of the fluidity and the fact that there is a lot
see as israel's dilemma: if iran's leaders won't agree to halt enrichment and the united states doesn't act, should israel strike on its own? the reason it might: as iran expands its program and drives it underground, israel's timeline to attack is much shorter than washington's. >> we do have a very good air force but your air force has more capabilities that we are not possessing, take for b2 bomber. we have only fighters bombs. >> reporter: general yadlin should know, he flew a fighter- bomber in the daring, 1981 mission to destroy saddam hussein's nuclear reactor in iraq, a strike washington tried to dissuade. >> you know the americans can wait until they really see the iranians really breaking it out. for the israelis it will be too late. >> reporter: yet many in israel's military and intelligence establishment, even yadlin, are cautioning netanyahu not to rush ahead of the u.s. this time, at least not yet. >> the vast majority of the military and intelligence people do not believe that a military strike today will be effective enough. look at the way the iranians have scattered
.5 million potential units a year ago, that is down to 2 million. i would emphasize that offsetting that is latent demand, all of these people doubling up are beginning to move back into the market. and it is giving them the wherewithal to buy homes of their own. >> tom: richard dekaser with us in washington with wells fargo. thanks, rich. >> my pleasure. >> susie: after weeks of speculation, facebook is adding a new search feature to its social media service. it's called "graph search," and it's designed to help users sort through content on the site. but is this a game-changer for the company? erika miller reports. >> reporter: it was facebook's first major press event since its initial public offering flopped in may. before the announcement, there was speculation facebook could unveil a smartphone or a web search engine, so a social search feature came as something of a letdown. the tool will help users search their social network for information that has already been shared with them. for example, a facebook user taking a trip to london might ask for "restaurants in london my fr
in the united states. but every single country if you take mali, look at mauritania to the west of mali, look to the east of mali you have niger, huge uranium deposits in niger, fourth largest producer in the world. these are the kinds of things that could happen to each of these areas and they could then spread south into other parts of africa. the french difference the ivory coast is another big factor in all of this and it allows them a logistical jumping off point for the conflict in mali. but it's also a vulnerable area which has had its own difficulties of late. >> suarez: you mentioned the arab spring. was the fall of qaddafi and libya something that lit the fuse across these other countries? >> i wouldn't say it lit the fuse. i call it -- to follow on that metaphor perhaps it would be accelerant. there was always a spark. northern mali had been marginalized politically and economically for some time. the tuaregs were seeking some legitimate grievances to be redressed but then suddenly you had fighters who would experienced freed up former mercenaries of qaddafi. you had enormous stock
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 162 (some duplicates have been removed)

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